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Featured CME
The Role of the Medical Consultant
Released: October 6, 2014 Expires: October 6, 2016
Medical consultation is an important clinical component for most hospitalists. Traditionally, consultants evaluated patients at the request of the referring physician (RP) and provided an assessment and recommendations. Today, hospitalists are also asked to provide both “curbside�advice and more comprehensive comanagement of medical problems. Hospitalists who are effective consultants communicate skillfully and act professionally. The following module describes the different roles that hospitalists can perform as medical consultants and provides strategies for improving communication and RP satisfaction.
Faculty:  Hugo Q. Cheng, MD and Leonard Feldman, MD
 

Perioperative Cardiac Risk Assessment
Released: January 22, 2014 Expires: January 22, 2016
Perioperative cardiac complications are the most widely feared medical issues for the anesthesiologist, surgeon, and medical consultant as they approach a patient with the option of surgery. To assess for the preoperative cardiac risk, hospitalists should follow a step-wise algorithm. The following module reviews the risk assessment process and enables the hospitalist to order appropriate preoperative testing.
Faculty:  Steven L. Cohn, MD, FACP, SFHM
 

Managing Diabetes and Hyperglycemia in the Hospital: Critically Ill and Surgical Patients
Released: December 13, 2013 Expires: December 13, 2015
Hospitalized patients with diabetes require specific medical management in order to minimize the risk of hyperglycemia. This requires hospitalists to have an understanding of methods for glycemic control in both the critically ill and noncritically ill patient. This module, which focuses on the critically ill hospitalized patient, is part of a 2-part series that will evaluate the current scientific evidence regarding glycemic control and discuss how to formulate preoperative and postoperative intensive care unit plans. In addition, a thorough review of the evidence for intraoperative glycemic control and a discussion of how to transition patients off of an insulin drip are provided.
Faculty:  Diana Childers, MD, and Pedro Ramos, MD
 

Managing Diabetes and Hyperglycemia in the Hospital: Focus on the Noncritically Ill Patient
Released: December 13, 2013 Expires: December 13, 2015
Hospitalized patients with diabetes require specific medical management in order to minimize the risk of hyperglycemia. This requires hospitalists to have an understanding of methods for glycemic control in both the critically ill and noncritically ill patient. This module, which focuses on the noncritically ill patient, is part of a 2-part series that will evaluate the current scientific evidence regarding glycemic control and discuss which medications are best for controlling blood glucose levels in the hospital. A thorough discussion of how to determine the appropriate insulin dose and develop an insulin regimen for hospitalized patients is provided, as well as strategies for developing a discharge plan for patients on insulin.
Faculty:  Pedro Ramos, MD, FHM and Diana Childers, MD, FHM
 

Perioperative Bridging of Anticoagulant Therapy
Released: December 13, 2013 Expires: December 13, 2015
Anticoagulant medications are commonly prescribed to patients in the United States for a number of medical problems. The risk of adverse outcomes, including permanent disability and death, from arterial and venous thromboembolism is high. Anticoagulant medications used to reduce the risk of thromboembolism can also be associated with serious bleeding outcomes. Physicians who prescribe these medications need to carefully weigh the risk of thromboembolism and potential for bleeding. In the periprocedural period, bleeding and thromboembolic risks are amplified. Careful decisions regarding management of chronic anticoagulation need to be undertaken. It is important for hospitalists, who are routinely asked to manage medically complex surgical patients, to understand periprocedural management of anticoagulation. This module discusses the risk of venous thromboembolism and arterial thromboembolism associated with the interruption of anticoagulation in patients with a history of these events. Risk of arterial thromboembolism in patients with atrial fibrillation and mechanical heart valves in the periprocedural period is also addressed. Preoperative and postoperative management of anticoagulation, accounting for patient and procedural risk factors of thromboembolism and bleeding, are also discussed.
Faculty:  Barbara Slawski, MD, MS, FACP
 





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